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Getting Past Some of the Top Barriers to IG Success

Recently, the IGI caught up with Scott Burt, President and CEO of Integro, one of IGI’s newest supporters to discuss some of the IG challenges they see in the market and how organizations are overcoming them. Integro, a Gartner “Cool Vendor” and recipient of IBM’s Worldwide Business Partner Governance Excellence Award, joined the Information Governance Initiative (IGI) this year. IGI Supporters, like Integro, provide an annual financial contribution that enables the activities of the IGI, and by doing so demonstrate their commitment to the advancement of information governance (IG).

Executive Support Is Key

We asked Scott what he thought were the biggest challenges organizations face today in terms of their ability to implement successful IG programs and projects.

“I believe the biggest challenge is having the consensus and the broad executive support to affect the culture and to effect change on the company to mature to the next level. Often IG initiatives don’t become a big enough priority or the cultural challenges seem too difficult. It’s hard to imagine IG having less of a priority when I see all the risk and exposure that I do, but not all companies recognize IG’s potential, not only in reducing risk, but also greatly improving business decision-making,” says Scott.

The good news is, challenges like this can be overcome and successful change management is possible, explains Scott. He’s witnessed and helped foster success across a variety of IG projects. Scott sees high level support and goal-setting as key elements to success.

“Support from the executive level makes a huge difference in a successful project. I recommend forming an executive level, cross-functional committee that has support from the Board or CEO. When chartered with goals and metrics that are effective for the company, this cross-functional leadership group can lead and direct and delegate to an executive who runs the program.

Likewise, it’s important to have goals and objectives that matter for the company. If the initiative and its goals don’t hold value for executives, they aren’t going to give it the time of day. With a cross functional executive team and goals that matter, the benefits can be huge,” he added.

Scott’s observations are consistent with IGI’s research results as reported in the 2015-16 IGI Annual Report. Change management was the third most commonly reported barrier to successful IG; 60% of IG practitioners identified it as a barrier to IG progress at their organizations. Additionally, more than one third of practitioners identified lack of executive support as a barrier.

IG Results Are Achievable: A Customer Success Story

One of Integro’s specialties is email governance, an area in which change management can be very tricky. All too often, Scott shares, he hears organizations and stakeholders within them making all types of excuses as to why they can’t effectively govern their emails.

“The thought of trying to change users’ email habits scares a lot of company executives. But it doesn’t need to be complicated or controversial. I’ve seen companies of all sizes, from small firms to large, multinational corporations, have success. explains Scott.

Scott points to a large email governance initiative as an example of a customer who achieved IG success by effectively garnering executive support and developing strong goals, as he recommends.

“We have a global, fortune 500 client with tens of thousands of users in dozens of countries. They have had tremendous success with an enterprise-wide email management solution Integro helped the company implement. The solution, which leverages Integro’s product, Integro Email Manager and Microsoft Exchange, enables the company to organize and manage email by its value. They retain a small percentage of corporate email that has value, while at the same time regularly, defensibly and soundly disposing of the transient content. The end result for the client has been millions saved on eDiscovery and storage costs. They are achieving the goal that so many think is too big of a challenge,” Scott says.

“This customer, like others who have been successful, did a great job of change management and communication. They had strong executive support up to the highest levels, and they followed a thorough change management plan that involved internal marketing and communications about the program and its importance,” he notes.

The customer’s specific approach to change management was so successful that Integro has used best practices from the project to help other companies undertaking similar endeavors.

“With the right amount of planning, forethought, and executive support, IG projects are very doable and can result in tremendous benefit for any company,” comments Scott.

 

About Integro

Integro is an award winning, industry recognized products and services firm specializing in Information Governance, Enterprise Content Management, and Content Security solutions. Since 1995, Integro has been delighting clients with technology solutions that support defensible disposal, minimize risk, reduce eDiscovery and storage costs, ensure compliance, govern email records, and enable auto-classification. Integro is proud to be named a Top ECM Consultant by research firm, Clutch, a “Cool Vendor” by analyst firm, Gartner, and a Worldwide Governance award-winner by IBM. Learn more at www.Integro.com.

 

Iron Mountain Launches New IG Resources Site

Are you an information governance professional who’s always on the lookout for tips and tricks to help you become even better in your role? You may find exactly what you’re looking for on InfoGoTo, a new website that focuses on serving content to everyone involved in the creation and management of information.

Launched in April by Iron Mountain, a charter supporter of the IGI, InfoGoTo, as the name suggests, seeks to become the go-to destination for IG professionals looking for helpful, insightful, and educational content.

“Whether you’re a RIM professional looking for creative ways to implement training programs, a governance and compliance manager seeking best practices for creating an internal culture of compliance, or an IT manager researching options for secure IT asset disposition, InfoGoTo is a trusted resource to help you manage your information needs,” the website’s About Us section reads.

The site features five topics: IG, Regulations & Compliance, Privacy & Security, Storage & Destruction, Training & Awareness, and Professional Development. It also has industry-specific content, with stories about the legal, healthcare, and financial services sectors on display.

For the month of May, InfoGoTo will publish content around the following themes: professional development and hiring skills, defensible disposition, IG leadership, and the state of tape. For June, the site will focus on how to create a culture of compliance and the effect of digital transformation on RIM and IG.

Sound like the content is right up your alley? Head on over to the site and check it out. Who knows? It could quickly become your go-to source for all things IG.

 

Information Governance Oversight: Questions for Board Members To Ask

Jason R. Baron, Of Counsel at Drinker, Biddle & Reath LLP and Co-chair of the Information Governance Initiative, has published an article in Ethical Boardroom titled, “Information Governance Oversight: Questions for Board Members To Ask.” The article provides insight into the emergence of a variety of calls for boards of directors to be asking questions of their CEOs, CISOs and CIOs about how companies are preparing for breaches and how they will deal with their aftermath through agreed protocols.

While factoring in cyber risk as an increasingly real part of the corporate world, arguably there is an even more fundamental material weakness across the enterprise that boards of directors should be addressing: the company’s lack of a clear information governance strategy or framework for decision-making.

Information governance has been defined as “the activities and technologies that organizations employ to maximize the value of their information while minimizing risks and costs”. Of course, a part of the overall risk posed by data is the possibility of cyber breach. But there is much more to information governance than simply addressing one’s security concerns. At bottom, there are the questions of why and how data has been left to accumulate in the first place and what policies are in place to manage and control its continued growth.

There are a host of overlapping issues surrounding not only security and preservation of data but also touching on data sensitivities and privacy, access to data in litigation and investigations, regulatory compliance and, increasingly, performing analytics for the purpose of monetizing corporate data assets. Board focus on cyber breach issues alone is a start, but, high-level attention should be paid to a much broader range of technical and policy issues touching on all aspects of the overall corporate data environment.

Read Jason’s full comments in “Information Governance Oversight: Questions for Board Members To Ask.

 

Guest Post: Privacy Lost – Can Information Privacy Survive the Era of Analytics?

Authored by Kon Leong, CEO and Founder of ZL Technologies

In a recent article published in Harvard Business Review, I discussed the growing capabilities of analytics technologies, and the need to be conscious of the privacy implications that accompany them. Though I believe the piece to be of general interest, it also offered focused advice for a management audience. Now, I would like to take a step back and expand the data privacy conversation, as well as provide some insight for the executive level.

Decoding Data Privacy

When I published the initial article, several of my colleagues responded that they believe data created at work necessarily cannot constitute personal information, and therefore belongs solely to the employer. Though I may have at one point agreed with this statement, my thinking has shifted in recent years. The influx of new data sources has given rise to more personal data being created—at work, at home, everywhere—while it simultaneously becomes harder to separate personal data from corporate data. In light of these changes, it could be time we rethink what privacy in the workplace really means.

In a corporate context, some might define privacy as meaning no organizational knowledge of sensitive, personal information. Due to regulatory and legal requirements to collect and preserve data, and the increasing rate at which such data is created, this is quickly becoming unrealistic. Do organizations then do their best to ignore this data, until it’s needed by Legal or Compliance? In today’s age, turning a blind eye to sensitive information and pretending it doesn’t exist is akin to the philosophy of “see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil”: The problem is that just because sensitive information goes untouched, doesn’t necessarily remove any or all privacy and security concerns.

Because it’s near impossible for us to keep personal data out of the organizational reach, more reasonably, modern privacy might simply come to mean that personal data cannot be improperly utilized, processed, or accessed. Although counterintuitive, in order for this type of system to work, an organization must have complete command over its data. In other words, rather than knowing as little as possible, this new information governance approach seeks to know more in order to exert control over data.

The following insight highlights this paradox: The CIA’s system of managing classified information could arguably be very intrusive because of the oftentimes private nature of the content it manages, and the expansiveness of its reach. However, thanks to classification schemes and access privileges, data can only be accessed for its intended purposes, thus ensuring privacy is maintained.

Privacy by Design

Although it can be extremely effective, the governance approach to privacy is easier said than done. Privacy can’t just be an afterthought. It must be instituted by design, at the architectural level of an organization’s information strategy.

Before going down this path, organizations should consider convening an information governance committee to determine what kind of compliance and ethical values they want the latest information technologies to usher in. The committee can help define corporate policies on gathering, handling, managing and analyzing what is perhaps the most significant asset of the modern enterprise: information.

Concurrently, begin internal assessments of employee values on privacy, ethics, and fair use of data. You may need to account for significant cultural and regulatory variations across different regions and countries. Such findings can then inform and guide the information governance committee in creating policies down the line.

The Road Ahead

When I published the original article in Harvard Business Review, I hoped to jumpstart the information privacy conversation. When compared to Europe, it’s hard to ignore the fact that the U.S. perspective towards privacy is less developed. However, with data growth only increasing, and new ways to track, monitor, and analyze individuals springing up all the time, it’s a conversation that’s getting harder to avoid, within living rooms and boardrooms alike.

These reasons alone might not be enough to get the U.S to rethink privacy. But if money talks, fines of up to 4% of global sales should be at least enough to get the ball rolling once the GDPR hits next May. Let’s just hope that for companies who wait until then to start planning, it’s not too little, too late.

 

Hidden Bias in the Black Box: Info Gov as a Key Check to Algorithmic Bias

by Jason R. Baron, Drinker Biddle & Reath, as seen on Legaltech News

With each passing day, we are 
 increasingly living in an algorithmic universe, due to the easy accumulation of big data. In our personal lives, we experience being in a 24/7 world of "filter bubbles," where Facebook has the ability to customize how liberal or conservative one's newsfeed is based on prior postings; Google personalizes ads popping up on Gmail based on the content of our conversations; and merchants like Amazon and Pandora feed us personalized recommendations based on our prior purchases and everything we click on.

While (at least in theory) we remain free in our personal lives to make choices in continuing to use these applications or not, increasingly often what we see is the result of hidden bias in the software. Similarly, in the workplace, the use of black box algorithms holds the potential of introducing certain types of bias without an employee's or prospective employee's knowledge. The question we wish to address here: From an information governance perspective, how can management provide some kind of check on the sometimes naïve, sometimes sophisticated use of algorithms in the corporate environment?

Algorithms in the Wild

An early, well-known example of the surprising power of algorithms was Target's use of software that, based on purchasing data (e.g., who was buying unscented lotions, cotton balls, etc.), was spookily able to predict whether a customer was likely pregnant. Target sent coupons for baby products to a Minnesota teenager's home before the teenager's father knew about the pregnancy, leading to a bad public relations episode. A different example is Massachusetts' use of a mobile app called Street Bump, where smartphones riding over potholes and the like would automatically report their location for local government to fix. The problem: the resulting map of potholes corresponded closely with the demographically more well-off areas of the city, as those were the areas where individuals knew to download the mobile app and could afford smartphones in the first place.

In workplace hiring decisions, facially neutral algorithms sometimes reveal a hidden bias based on how features are selected and weighted, or where certain variables used in the algorithm essentially function as "proxies" for real world racial or ethnic differences. For example, a software feature using the variable "commuting distance from work" as a factor in deciding which candidates to hire may, depending on local geography, discriminate based on race. As Gideon Mann and Cathy O'Neill stated in Harvard Business Review (12/9/16), "When humans build algorithmic screening software, they may unintentionally determine which applicants will be selected or rejected based on outdated information—going back to a time when there were fewer women in the workforce, for example—leading to a legally and morally unacceptable result."

Once on the job, employees may experience a very different kind of filter bias through software targeting the risk of internal threats to the company. The more advanced programs coming onto the market use sentiment analysis (e.g., algorithms looking at language used in emails) to predict whether certain individuals are more likely to display anger or other inappropriate behavior in the workplace. This capacity can be combined with matching up external sources of data on individuals obtained online, including credit report updates, crime reports, and certain types of medical information, to essentially triage the employee population into "high-risk" and lower risk categories, so as to target the keystrokes made by a few. If this all sounds like we have truly now entered a pre-crime, Minority Report world, it does.

IG and Its Role with Algorithms

What can or should be done? Mann & O'Neill suggest to avoid making decisions solely by use of an algorithm, but include what they call "algorithm-informed" individuals. They further suggest, "[w]e need to audit and modify algorithms so that they do not perpetuate inequities in businesses and society," with audits to be carried out either by inside experts or by hiring outside professionals. These are both sound suggestions.

Advocates of information governance (IG) argue that corporations with an IG program in place have a built-in mechanism to escalate data-related issues to a standing committee, consisting of either C-suite representatives or their delegates. In a growing number of corporate models, an individual with some kind of IG designation in their title will have been given authority to call together ad hoc groups to resolve specific data policy issues.

One could well imagine a chief information governance officer convening an ad hoc task force of the IG council, including a C-suite representative of the corporate human relations (HR) department, along with the person who approved or manages the data analytics software used by HR and a senior counsel, to perform the kind of "audit" of hiring practices envisioned above. Similarly, an ad hoc task force including the chief information security officer, senior HR office personnel, and other IT representatives and senior counsel could be asked to review how well internal monitoring of employees is working, and how much transparency or notice should be given to staff on such monitoring.

Along these lines, organizations might consider tasking a group of individuals—under the auspices either of the IG structure or as a freestanding committee—to perform a similar function to a present-day institutional review board, but limited to predictive software's effect on human subjects. Such an "algorithm review board" (ARB) would be tasked to provide approval and/or oversight of any use of analytics in the workplace aimed at targeting present employees or prospective hires, so as to serve as a check against possible hidden bias or a lack of notice where appropriate.

Some corporations (Microsoft and Facebook) have taken initial steps to implement, at least on a selected basis, an ethics review board being used in an equivalent way to an ARB. However, the practice remains rare across all industry verticals, notwithstanding the growing power of analytics in all aspects of daily life.

In his book, "The Black Box Society: The Secret Algorithms That Control Money and Information," law professor Frank Pasquale states that "authority is increasingly expressed algorithmically," and that "[d]ecisions that used to be based on human reflection are now made automatically." But, as computer scientist Suresh Venkatasubramanian has put it, "The irony is that the more we design artificial intelligence technology that successfully mimics humans, the more that A.I. is learning in a way that we do, with all of our biases and limitations."

This new reality calls for consideration of some kind of human intervention to serve as a quality control check on the black box (even if it means humans employing a second algorithm to check for bias in the first!) In the coming world we live and work in, adoption of some kind of IG framework that includes reviewing the possibility of algorithmic bias in the workplace will be appreciated by an increasingly sophisticated populace.




Jason R. Baron is Of Counsel at Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP in Washington, D.C.

 

Information Governance Benchmark 2017: The Business Value of Long-Term Digital Information

In 2016 we were pleased to work closely with IGI Supporter Preservica to benchmark the state of the industry on the critical issue of governing and preserving long-term digital information. Our Benchmark Report exposed the troubling dynamic that while virtually every organization (98%) needs digital information for longer than ten years, very few (16%) have a viable approach.

This year, we dig even deeper, trying to get to the bottom of this dysfunctional dynamic and learn what IG professionals are doing about it.

The upshot?

Our 2017 research could not be clearer: long-term digital information is more important than ever. It's driving business value and protecting organizations from risk. It is also proliferating, and can be found in more business functions and systems that before. Finally, the consequences of failing to properly govern and preserve long-term digital information only grow graver, with the impact felt all the way up to the CEO and board of directors.

Here are some additional highlights:

It’s the C-suite that suffers most. IG professionals told us that their CEOs, General Counsels, heads of Records Management, CIOs, and Boards of Directors are those most affected by failure in this area. Dropping the ball on governing and preserving long-term digital information not only creates multiple sources of legal, security, and compliance risks, but it also starves the organization of the information raw materials it needs to understand what happened so it can intelligently predict what will happen. As big data technologies and techniques continue to radically improve our ability to harness our data, this failure will only grow as a grave threat to competitiveness and innovation.

Business value rises to compliment risk. Value and risk are two sides of the same coin –a dynamic that has played out since the very beginning of commerce itself. But while legal and regulatory requirements have long driven preservation and governance of long-term digital information, the quest for business value is rising as a major driver too. In fact, the vast majority of organizations (83%) realize (or plan to realize) direct business value from their long-term digital information, targeting areas like market analysis, product development, and customer service.

Proliferation across systems and functions. While it is no surprise that collaboration environments (e.g., file sync and share, enterprise content management) are identified by IG professionals as the most likely location for long-term digital information, we were surprised by other systems in the top five, including accounting and transactional systems. Long-term digital information is proliferating.

Awareness of technological solutions lags. Why do organizations struggle to realize business value from their long-term digital information? IG professionals told us that two of the biggest reasons are organizational immaturity and a lack of proper tools and technology. At the same time, they told us that capabilities like “ensuring readability and usability of information” and “proving authenticity and trustworthiness” are critical to their ability to govern and preserve long-term digital information. These are capabilities that can in fact only be delivered through technology, and in fact technology that has been designed specifically to address the range of challenges inherent to long-term digital information. These technologies are available today, and it is disappointing to see that awareness of them and access to them continues to plague organizations.

We have captured additional insights in a series of infographics that we encourage you to download and put to good use as you build support for solving this problem in your organization. It was a pleasure to work with Preservica on this research, and we hope you get value from its insights. We look forward to bringing you the next benchmark in 2018.

Click here to view & download the Preservica 2017 Benchmark Infographics in the IGI Community.