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Take a Look Inside the IGI Annual Report 2015-16: Where Are Organizations Buying IG Services?

Have you taken the 2016-2017 IGI Annual Survey? Help us develop our next Annual Report by sharing your insights! Take the Survey today.

In our previous look inside last year’s IGI Annual Report 2015-2016, the industry’s most comprehensive research on information governance (IG) as a concept, profession, and market, we discussed predictions for IG spending in 2016. Today, we look at what technologies the community considers part of the IG market.

Organizations are buying IG services. Forty percent of practitioners reported that their organizations were purchasing IG services, today, and around the same amount reported that they planned to in 2016.

Software and hardware professional services groups were the most commonly identified source of IG services by practitioners now and in 2016, with boutique consulting firms specializing in IG coming in at a close second and law firms third. Just under half said that their organizations are not currently purchasing IG services. Why? Some may be filling their IG personnel needs through other means like direct hiring or internal promotions. Others, however, simply may not be at the optimal IG program maturity level to purchase IG.

IG products and services seem to go hand-in-hand. Indeed, nearly half of our IG provider respondents say that they provide both products and services. Only 14% say they sell products only. Organizations purchasing technology often need help implementing and configuring it, so it is not surprising that professional services groups at software and hardware providers led the way as the most commonly identified source for IG services.

The IGI has begun the process of developing the 2016-2017 IGI Annual Report, building upon the success of the last two years. As part of the research for our Report, we are conducting a survey of information governance professionals. Please participate in our survey to help us create a great resource for the IG Community. The results will be published in a comprehensive Annual Report which will include a variety of infographics and other tools we will freely provide to the IG Community under a Creative Commons license. These infographics have become part of many IG practitioners’ internal presentations, and the Annual Report has become the go-to reference guide for many in the industry. In the meantime, take a look insider last year’s report. All data you provide through this survey will be reported anonymously.

 

Join IGI and Today’s General Counsel at the Information Governance Forum in Atlanta, November 3rd, 2016

There is still time to register for the Information Governance Forum on November 3rd, 2016 in Atlanta, GA at the Buckhead Club. Register, today!

The Information Governance Forum is the first program developed and delivered through new partnership between the IGI and Today’s General Counsel Institute (TGCI). The partnership between IGI and TGCI is focused on bringing IG insight to information professionals of all backgrounds and reflects the growing multidisciplinary nature of IG and recognizes the critical role that general counsels play in IG.

Based on a roundtable format that is ideal for emerging challenges like IG, this inaugural Forum will focus on facilitated conversations designed to rapidly increase your IG insight and fluency. Beginning with a discussion of IG as a concept, discipline, and market based on IGI’s Annual Report research, this day of peer discussion will move through a broad range of topics, each with a practical implication for IG programs at all levels of maturity.

Join members of the IGI Executive Team, Barclay T. Blair, Jason R. Baron, and Jay Brudz, and an amazing line of IG practitioner faculty who will help guide you through the day’s exciting agenda:

  • Session 1: Information Governance and You: Framing the Discussion: Information Governance is a nascent discipline that many legal and other professionals are encountering for the first time. To help us establish a common frame of reference for the day’s discussions, our faculty will present and discuss key IGI research about how organizations define IG, who is in charge, and what projects they are actually doing.
  • Session 2: Who Is Doing IG, and What Are They Doing?: The best way to understand how to move forward with IG is to hear about actual examples of the IG projects and activities that organizations are doing. In this session we will hear from organizations that have adopted IG and learn: How they got started. Biggest challenges and how to overcome them. Tips for selling IG internally. How to promote IG: risk reduction or value creation?
  • Session 3: Identifying and Coordinating IG Stakeholders: In the group exercise, our faculty will take you through a battle-tested methodology for identifying the critical IG stakeholders and what they care about, while identifying areas where they are most likely to cooperate or resist. Throughout this exercise, we will learn ideas including: Why IG needs a new kind of senior leader at the C-level. Why a siloed approach to managing information will fail. How IG serves a coordinating function between the various facets of IG:
  • Session 4: The Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and IG: What You Can Do Today: In 2016, fewer developments in IG are as profound as the new changes to the US Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. These amendments lay the groundwork for fundamentally changing the way courts adjudicate proportionality and sanctions in e-discovery, potentially giving IG practitioners a new level of certainty in taking control of their information. But, organizations must move carefully and deliberately. Our peer discussion, led by FRCP and IG experts, will discuss the practical impact of the FRCP changes and what organizations must be doing today to address and take advantage of these changes in their IG programs.
  • Session 5: IG and Cybersecurity: The Role of the General Counsel and the IG Team: We see a new conversation about cybersecurity starting. Post data breach, institutions are not only asking, “How could we have protected this information better?” but also, “Why do we have this information in the first place?” Unfortunately most organizations have neither the corporate governance framework nor the business process to answer this deceptively simple question in a way that satisfies legal, IT, or the business. IG provides a potential solution to this problem, and GCs are well positioned with expertise, and authority to step up and lead. Our peer discussion in this session will focus on what GCs taking this on have learned and what the rest of us can take away about using IG for preventing, preparing for, and responding to data breaches and other cybersecurity challenges.
  • Session 6: Automating Information Governance: No less an authority than the US National Archives and Records Administration has declared that the future of managing and governing information is automation. However, automation can mean many things, from NARA’s “capstone” approach to email management that applies rules based on employee role, to the most sophisticated algorithmic forms of automated classification and discovery of data’s “meaning.” The good news is that many of these techniques have already been through a kind of trial by fire in the e-discovery realm, and IG practitioners have learned important lessons that can help us put these next-generation tools and techniques to work today.
  • Session 7: Quantified IG: Throughout the day we have focused on a wide range of immediate IG challenges that organizations face, and have learned ways to tackle them. However it is also critical for all of us to keep one eye on what’s next, so we are not (or at least less) surprised by macro and micro-trends in law, technology, corporate governance and other areas of business and life. One of these critical trends is what the IGI calls “Quantified IG” and it is about IG practitioners and programs adopting the data-driven techniques that are radically changing everything from how much food we eat and how much we exercise (i.e., through fitness trackers) to the most consequential public policy decisions about healthcare and global finance. However, in many areas of IG, decisions are still being made based on nothing more than tradition, supposition, and superstition.

The Forum will be an exciting, engaging, and interactive day. Don’t come expecting to sit on your hands. Register, today.

 

Nearly Half of Organizations Are Using Four Modes of Enterprise Communication Concurrently

Join IGI Founder & Executive Director, Barclay T. Blair, at Actiance’s Executive Briefing Series on October 18, 2016 in Washington, DC.

 The IGI has partnered again with Actiance for a second Executive Briefing series. The series looks at the various communication channels (e.g. unified communications, instant messaging, social media, and voice) employees are now using in the workplace and discusses how, "It’s not just about email anymore!" The Executive Series explores the information governance (and specifically eDiscovery) challenges these new forms of communication present and how your organization can take steps to find and preserve enterprise communications to meet your legal, regulatory, and other obligations. See below for dates and locations to get a complimentary registration.

At the most recent briefing in the series, discussion focused on how companies are increasingly seeing requests from their employees to support new communication channels. Slack, for example has come up frequently, and text messaging is also a growing concern. Companies are also starting to be aware that more e-discovery of social communications tools is happening. However, despite increased requests to support these new forms of communication and both concern and awareness of the challenges that they present, companies are lagging behind in incorporating these new forms of enterprise into their information governance polices.

 Join us for the next briefing. Executive Briefings are intimate events where we share a wonderful meal, share what we have learned, and you share with your peers what you have learned. Space is very limited, so please register now for an Executive Briefing at a city near you.

The next event is in Washington, DC., where you will hear directly from IGI Founder & Executive Director, Barclay T. Blair.

  • October 18, 2016—Washington, DC

Registration is complimentary. Register here now.

Read about briefings in the previous series at the links below.
Automation Can Facilitate Taking Reasonable Steps to Preserve ESI Involving New Forms of Communication (April 5, 2016; Dallas, TX)
Effectively Governing New Forms of Communication Isn’t Just About Compliance (April 14, 2016; Boston, MA)
Do You Have A Shadow IT Problem? (April 19, 2016; Chicago, IL)
New Enterprise Messaging Tech, New IG Challenges (May 17, 2016; Minneapolis, MN)
Are You Taking Reasonable Steps to Preserve Your Enterprise Communications (June 2, 2016; Charlotte, NC)

 

 
Resilient leaders

Change Management Is a Barrier to Effective IG Decision Making: Recap of Executive Briefing on Enterprise Communications

Join IGI Founder & Executive Director, Barclay T. Blair, at Actiance’s Executive Briefing Series on October 18, 2016 in Washington, DC.

 The IGI has partnered again with Actiance for a second Executive Briefing series. The series looks at the various communication channels (e.g. unified communications, instant messaging, social media, and voice) employees are now using in the workplace and discusses how, "It’s not just about email anymore!" The Executive Series explores the information governance (and specifically eDiscovery) challenges these new forms of communication present and how your organization can take steps to find and preserve enterprise communications to meet your legal, regulatory, and other obligations. See below for dates and locations to get a complimentary registration.

The most recent event in the Executive Briefing Series, held in Hartford, Connecticut this month, was attended by a mix of practitioners including those working in IT, legal, and compliance functions. While practitioners in attendance recognized the importance of effectively governing information created through these new modes of communication—including so-called ROT (information that is redundant, obsolete, or trivial)—some are still getting stuck on the road to implementation. Promisingly, one firm reported that it did have a working process to dispose of ROT. Getting rid of ROT is a doable task given current technology. Unfortunately, many others are still reluctant to pull the trigger to get rid of their junk despite the increased data protection risks and data management hassles it creates. It was noted, too, that recent amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure which some expected to ease fears about eliminating ROT haven’t yet changed preservation practices. Implementing a new approach isn’t just about the rules or technological capabilities, it is also about change management—getting people to behave differently. IGI research shows that change management is a major impediment to getting IG projects done, with a majority of IG practitioners (60%) identifying it as a barrier to effective IG.

Join us for the next briefing. Executive Briefings are intimate events where we share a wonderful meal, share what we have learned, and you share with your peers what you have learned. Space is very limited, so please register now for an Executive Briefing at a city near you.

The next event is in Washington, DC, where you will hear directly from IGI Founder & Executive Director, Barclay T. Blair.

  • October 18, 2016—Washington, DC

Registration is complimentary. Register here now.

Read about briefings in the previous series at the links below.
Automation Can Facilitate Taking Reasonable Steps to Preserve ESI Involving New Forms of Communication (April 5, 2016; Dallas, TX)
Effectively Governing New Forms of Communication Isn’t Just About Compliance (April 14, 2016; Boston, MA)
Do You Have A Shadow IT Problem? (April 19, 2016; Chicago, IL)
New Enterprise Messaging Tech, New IG Challenges (May 17, 2016; Minneapolis, MN)
Are You Taking Reasonable Steps to Preserve Your Enterprise Communications (June 2, 2016; Charlotte, NC)

 

 

What Technologies Are Part of the IG Products Market?

Have you taken the 2016-2017 IGI Annual Survey? Help us develop our next Annual Report by sharing your insights! Take the Survey today.

In our previous look inside last year’s IGI Annual Report 2015-2016, the industry’s most comprehensive research on information governance (IG) as a concept, profession, and market, we discussed predictions for IG spending in 2016. Today, we look at what technologies the community considers part of the IG market.

We asked the IG community which technologies they believed were part of the IG product market. As we saw last year, survey respondents have a very broad understanding of what makes up this market. This is not surprising given the breadth with which the IG community views the concept of IG. The range of technologies required to serve these disparate information-related functions and to address the ways in which information moves between them would necessarily be fairly broad.

Of the twenty-two enumerated technologies, fourteen of them received 50% or more support for inclusion in the IG product market. RIM, information security, e-discovery, data governance, and data storage and archiving were the most popular. Though we did add several additional technologies since last year, we note that across the board for technologies listed both years, the percentage of votes for inclusion in the product market is down. We saw a similar drop for facets the IG community would include in the concept of IG. We see this as a sign that the IG market is starting to mature and that both the technologies and functional areas that make up IG’s core are coming into greater focus.

We do not mean to say that any of the listed products that comprise the IG product market are “IG technologies,” per se, as they are not broad enough to cover all information-related activities in an organization. Each of them is rather a point of management and control of information within the facets to be coordinated by IG.

That said, we were curious to see whether the community thought that there was a category of software or technology on the market that they considered to be “IG” software or technology. Almost half said no; 30% were not sure. However, around a fifth (22%) said yes. Contenders for such a role, as suggested by the comments respondents provided, were technologies that integrated several of the information-related functions of multiple facets across the enterprise. We will continue to focus on these and related questions as we conduct further research on the emerging IG market.

The IGI has begun the process of developing the 2016-2017 IGI Annual Report, building upon the success of the last two years. As part of the research for our Report, we are conducting a survey of information governance professionals. Please participate in our survey to help us create a great resource for the IG Community. The results will be published in a comprehensive Annual Report which will include a variety of infographics and other tools we will freely provide to the IG Community under a Creative Commons license. These infographics have become part of many IG practitioners’ internal presentations, and the Annual Report has become the go-to reference guide for many in the industry. In the meantime, take a look insider last year’s report. All data you provide through this survey will be reported anonymously.

 

Take a Look Inside the IGI Annual Report 2015-16: Spending on IG will Increase

Have you taken the 2016-2017 IGI Annual Survey? Help us develop our next Annual Report by sharing your insights! Take the Survey today.

In our previous look inside last year’s IGI Annual Report 2015-2016 , the industry’s most comprehensive research on information governance (IG) as a concept, profession, and market, we discussed the number of projects organizations are undertaking and what they are spending. Today, we look at predictions for spending increase in 2016.

While the IG market may not be perfectly defined today, organizations are taking action and spending money on IG. However, is spending predicted to increase in 2016? We asked practitioners who told us their organizations had at least one active IG project whether they expected spending to increase in 2016 and, if so, by how much. For providers who reported at least one active IG project at their typical customer, we asked parallel questions with respect to revenue generated from IG. Here is what we found.

Of those practitioners who reported that they were actively doing IG projects today, nearly half said they expected spending to increase next year. Providers are even more optimistic about market growth with 91% telling us they expect revenue earned from IG to increase in 2016. In fact, a solid portion of both groups predict that their spending will increase dramatically. For example, nearly half of practitioners predict an increase of 30% or more, and over one-quarter predict an increase of 50% or more. Of those organizations that report actively doing the work of IG today, a solid segment predict both spending more than last year and a lot more in 2016.

The IGI has begun the process of developing the 2016-2017 IGI Annual Report, building upon the success of the last two years. As part of the research for our Report, we are conducting a survey of information governance professionals. Please participate in our survey to help us create a great resource for the IG Community. The results will be published in a comprehensive Annual Report which will include a variety of infographics and other tools we will freely provide to the IG Community under a Creative Commons license. These infographics have become part of many IG practitioners’ internal presentations, and the Annual Report has become the go-to reference guide for many in the industry. In the meantime, take a look insider last year’s report. All data you provide through this survey will be reported anonymously.