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Download Our Newest Deep Dive Case Study on Pandora Media

How Pandora Tuned In to Information Governance
To Take Control of Its Most Sensitive and Valuable Information Assets

An IGI Case Study

Usually when we think "Information Governance," we think traditional, large, litigated and regulated organizations. But as more and more organizations come to understand the value of IG, this image is rapidly changing. Recently, Pandora Media — a juggernaut in the streaming music business — partnered with IGI Supporter Active Navigation and its experts in governance and file analysis on a major IG project. We were fortunate enough to be able to do a deep dive on this project and bring the details to you.

Download the latest entry in our IG At Work series to learn:

  • How Pandora got rid of 60 percent of its unstructured data.
  • What it took for the company to identify and protect its most valuable and sensitive data. 
  • How Pandora developed policies for governing unstructured information.
  • How Pandora built executive support for IG. 
  • How Pandora used file analysis software to reach its IG goals.
  • How Pandora was able to sell the merits of IG to its employees.

The company that emerged on the other side of this critical IG project was more efficient, more versatile and more competitive. And their IG program only continues to grow in its sophistication and impact.

Click here to access the case study in the IGI Community.

 

3 Critical Qualities of Resilient Information Leaders

“Resilience” has become a buzzword, as all seemingly simple and intuitive psychological concepts do once they penetrate our public (and commercial) consciousness. The current buzz around resilience, whether applied to the environmentcompanies, or children, originated in the field of psychology with researchers trying to determine what makes one person seemingly bulletproof while another, who appears to have every emotional advantage, crumbles when faced with minor adversity. Resilience even has its own counter-buzz, signaling that it has conclusively reached memetic status.

Studies of resilience focus on how we respond to both “environmental” threats—problems that are chronic and less intense but no less difficult—as well as “acute” threats that cause shorter bursts of intense adversity or trauma.

Information leaders face both types of adversity. “House on fire” emergencies like lawsuits, investigations, and cybersecurity breaches represent acute, intense threats that can be all consuming but relatively short in duration. Information leaders also face chronic adversity and threat, often in the form of problems that continue to emerge and reemerge—including long-term efforts to build and enforce an information governance program; evaluating, purchasing, and implementing enterprise software; or guiding a years-long change management program, to name a few.

What Builds Resilience?

Norman Garmezy was a pioneer in the study of psychological resilience. His critical insight was that studying successful people could yield insights not likely to come from studying failure (the common approach at the time). His research led to the identification of several “protective factors” that resilient people have.

Not surprisingly, this research also found that pure luck is a big factor. Some people with an otherwise tough life find a great mentor, bond with an emotionally mature caregiver, find easy financial success, and so on. Others have no luck other than bad luck and it simply overwhelms them no matter what their other qualities.

Luck is no small factor in the lives of information leaders. Sometimes the server just blows up. Sometimes a crucial staff member falls ill or leaves. Management priorities change. Sometimes “mistakes are made,” and there is nothing that anyone could have done to anticipate or prevent them. Recognizing bad luck and not feeling responsible for it or allowing it to drive magical thinking about being “cursed” is a key “protective factor” exhibited by resilient people generally and resilient information leaders specifically.

All resilient people have common qualities. At the Information Governance Initiative, through our research and experience working with IG professionals—including those leading incredibly stressful projects like e-discovery in “bet-the-company” litigation and security breaches—we have learned that resilient information leaders also share many common qualities.

Here are three of those qualities. Join our webinar where we will reveal more details about these and the other six habits that resilient e-discovery leaders share. The 9 Habits of Resilient e-Discovery Leaders webinar is hosted by EDRM.

1. They don’t try to be heroes.

In the face of acute adversity, resilient e-discovery and information governance leaders avoid the misguided sense of heroism that is often associated with focusing on a crisis to the exclusion of everything else. American business in particular has canonized and internalized the image of the cowboy: the rugged individual with a complete absence of emotional need, a singular focus on getting the job done no matter what, and a superhuman ability to do it all himself. The lie of this myth is born out in study after study showing stress levels going up and productivity, health, and job satisfaction levels going down in workplaces that implicitly encourage, and explicitly reward, this behavior.

Neglecting personal relationships and sacrificing wellbeing by eating poorly and shirking exercise have real consequences over the long term—something that resilient information leaders recognize and incorporate into their working life, even when “the house is on fire."

Although times of crisis may demand periods of extreme intensity and long hours, they are not sustainable; nor, in most cases, is the damage of trying to sustain this posture—anxiety, insomnia, elevated cholesterol, depression—worth the reward.

2. They play to their strengths—and acknowledge their weaknesses.

Resilient people do not need to be gifted people. In fact, research from developmental psychologist Emmy Werner has shown that a more reliable predictor of resilience is the ability to put your skills to work effectively. For an information professional in the early part of your career, this means learning what your real strengths and weaknesses are, and seeking roles that play to your strengths and minimize opportunities for your weaknesses to limit you. This does not mean avoiding new challenges—in fact, a predictable quality of resilient people is that they seek out new experiences and challenges. However, it does mean understanding your strengths and seeking ways to learn about, identify, and apply them at their full potential.

For information leaders in mid-career and beyond, this also means having the wisdom to supplement your weaknesses by delegating, building a team that complements each other, and hiring deputies who have the strengths you lack but are necessary for e-discovery success. For example, if you have a deep technical understanding but are terrible at putting together a project plan, seek out those who are amazing project managers.

3. They don’t grant failure undue power.

Fulfilling our potential as people, and as information leaders, is dependent upon our ability to absorb, bounce back from, and learn from mistakes and failures. One of the most powerful predictors of resilience is how we perceive potentially traumatic events. In fact, how you view an event, like a stressful and scary e-discovery demand, actually determines whether or not it is in fact ultimately traumatic.

The research gets even more fascinating, clearly showing that exposure to events that could be very traumatic does not actually predict how well a person will function in the future. Rather, the most reliable predictor is the way that person views, or “construes,” an event. This does not mean that we must be Pollyannas or deify the “power of positive thinking,” but it does demonstrate the objective effect that our response to difficult events actually has on whether or not we are traumatized by them. The best news is that the ability to construe potentially painful events in a way that minimizes their harm can actually be taught and learned—with practice and a lot of patience.

Our ability to bear adversity in both our personal and working lives is ultimately simple math: i.e., is the depth of the adversity greater than our resilience? Everyone has a breaking point. Highly resilient people have a higher breaking point. It is important, and I believe uplifting, to realize that these qualities can in large measure be learned. One powerful learning technique is modeling people we aspire to be like, and in the information governance community we are we are fortunate to have so many great e-discovery leaders who we can learn from as true models of resilience.

 

Presidential Tweets and Self-Destructing Messages Under the Records Laws: The New Normal

Washington, D.C. of counsel Jason R. Baron published an article in Bloomberg Law titled “Presidential Tweets and Self-Destructing Messages Under the Records Laws: The New Normal.”

Jason discusses the recordkeeping challenges and legal developments that result from presidential tweets and other forms of communications used by White House personnel in the Trump administration.

Jason also notes that these legal developments raise a number of information governance issues that have direct applicability to private sector institutes.

Read "Presidential Tweets and Self-Destructing Messages Under the Records Laws: The New Normal."

 

How the General Counsel Can Shape Information Governance

Jake Frazier – Senior Managing Director, FTI Consulting & Sonia Cheng – Senior Director, FTI Consulting
As seen on ethicalboardroom.com

 

Information governance is often thought about in the context of IT efficiency, data security and regulatory compliance. While it is true that these are the most critical drivers for executing data governance programmes, there is an equally important factor that deeply resonates with a corporation’s board and C-suite: reputational risk.

Just as trust is a key and fragile pillar for relationships in our personal lives, it is essential – among shareholders, clients, customers and employees – for a business to thrive. Ultimately, top company leadership is responsible for managing reputational risk and ensuring that the overall direction of the company will uphold trust in the brand.

As we’ve seen countless times, failure to handle data properly often results in damaging data breaches, which beyond legal and compliance violations, break trust and allow doubt to become part of a company’s image. Thus, it is critical that the board views information governance (IG) as being about compliance and legal risk, as it must be, but also as an effort to instil a high standard for ethics and privacy into the company’s culture. By embracing this mindset, a corporation’s leadership can set the correct tone from the top down, building advocacy for actionable programmes that ensure safe and responsible handling of sensitive data, as well as strong compliance and efficiency.

“BECAUSE THE GENERAL COUNSEL HAS HISTORICALLY BEEN THE GO-TO STAKEHOLDER FOR DEALING WITH HIGHLY SENSITIVE ISSUES… THE CORPORATE LEGAL TEAM IS UNIQUELY POSITIONED TO LEAD THE CHARGE TOWARDS PROACTIVE DATA GOVERNANCE”

Because the general counsel (GC) has historically been the go-to stakeholder for dealing with highly sensitive issues – primarily for litigation and investigations – the corporate legal team is uniquely positioned to lead the charge towards proactive data governance. Given this fact, the issue of ethical obligation comes into play. In the US, federal and state laws require companies to implement reasonable security protections to safeguard personal data. There is a wide range of similar requirements around the world.

Beyond the duty to disclose, legal teams also have an ethical obligation to maintain a level of technical knowledge. In Day v. LSI Corp., in-house counsel was sanctioned for failing to document and supervise the discovery collection process and for allowing the company’s document retention policy to be ignored. In the context of IG, this is important, as legal teams must have a clear understanding about data sources and retention practices, the impact of how they choose to handle electronically stored information, and accuracy of how facts are represented to regulators, opposing parties and the courts. Ultimately, these points illustrate the fact that ethical obligations cannot be overlooked when considering the GC’s role in IG efforts.

Click here to continue reading about the top issues for 2017...

 

Getting Past Some of the Top Barriers to IG Success

Recently, the IGI caught up with Scott Burt, President and CEO of Integro, one of IGI’s newest supporters to discuss some of the IG challenges they see in the market and how organizations are overcoming them. Integro, a Gartner “Cool Vendor” and recipient of IBM’s Worldwide Business Partner Governance Excellence Award, joined the Information Governance Initiative (IGI) this year. IGI Supporters, like Integro, provide an annual financial contribution that enables the activities of the IGI, and by doing so demonstrate their commitment to the advancement of information governance (IG).

Executive Support Is Key

We asked Scott what he thought were the biggest challenges organizations face today in terms of their ability to implement successful IG programs and projects.

“I believe the biggest challenge is having the consensus and the broad executive support to affect the culture and to effect change on the company to mature to the next level. Often IG initiatives don’t become a big enough priority or the cultural challenges seem too difficult. It’s hard to imagine IG having less of a priority when I see all the risk and exposure that I do, but not all companies recognize IG’s potential, not only in reducing risk, but also greatly improving business decision-making,” says Scott.

The good news is, challenges like this can be overcome and successful change management is possible, explains Scott. He’s witnessed and helped foster success across a variety of IG projects. Scott sees high level support and goal-setting as key elements to success.

“Support from the executive level makes a huge difference in a successful project. I recommend forming an executive level, cross-functional committee that has support from the Board or CEO. When chartered with goals and metrics that are effective for the company, this cross-functional leadership group can lead and direct and delegate to an executive who runs the program.

Likewise, it’s important to have goals and objectives that matter for the company. If the initiative and its goals don’t hold value for executives, they aren’t going to give it the time of day. With a cross functional executive team and goals that matter, the benefits can be huge,” he added.

Scott’s observations are consistent with IGI’s research results as reported in the 2015-16 IGI Annual Report. Change management was the third most commonly reported barrier to successful IG; 60% of IG practitioners identified it as a barrier to IG progress at their organizations. Additionally, more than one third of practitioners identified lack of executive support as a barrier.

IG Results Are Achievable: A Customer Success Story

One of Integro’s specialties is email governance, an area in which change management can be very tricky. All too often, Scott shares, he hears organizations and stakeholders within them making all types of excuses as to why they can’t effectively govern their emails.

“The thought of trying to change users’ email habits scares a lot of company executives. But it doesn’t need to be complicated or controversial. I’ve seen companies of all sizes, from small firms to large, multinational corporations, have success. explains Scott.

Scott points to a large email governance initiative as an example of a customer who achieved IG success by effectively garnering executive support and developing strong goals, as he recommends.

“We have a global, fortune 500 client with tens of thousands of users in dozens of countries. They have had tremendous success with an enterprise-wide email management solution Integro helped the company implement. The solution, which leverages Integro’s product, Integro Email Manager and Microsoft Exchange, enables the company to organize and manage email by its value. They retain a small percentage of corporate email that has value, while at the same time regularly, defensibly and soundly disposing of the transient content. The end result for the client has been millions saved on eDiscovery and storage costs. They are achieving the goal that so many think is too big of a challenge,” Scott says.

“This customer, like others who have been successful, did a great job of change management and communication. They had strong executive support up to the highest levels, and they followed a thorough change management plan that involved internal marketing and communications about the program and its importance,” he notes.

The customer’s specific approach to change management was so successful that Integro has used best practices from the project to help other companies undertaking similar endeavors.

“With the right amount of planning, forethought, and executive support, IG projects are very doable and can result in tremendous benefit for any company,” comments Scott.

 

About Integro

Integro is an award winning, industry recognized products and services firm specializing in Information Governance, Enterprise Content Management, and Content Security solutions. Since 1995, Integro has been delighting clients with technology solutions that support defensible disposal, minimize risk, reduce eDiscovery and storage costs, ensure compliance, govern email records, and enable auto-classification. Integro is proud to be named a Top ECM Consultant by research firm, Clutch, a “Cool Vendor” by analyst firm, Gartner, and a Worldwide Governance award-winner by IBM. Learn more at www.Integro.com.

 

Iron Mountain Launches New IG Resources Site

Are you an information governance professional who’s always on the lookout for tips and tricks to help you become even better in your role? You may find exactly what you’re looking for on InfoGoTo, a new website that focuses on serving content to everyone involved in the creation and management of information.

Launched in April by Iron Mountain, a charter supporter of the IGI, InfoGoTo, as the name suggests, seeks to become the go-to destination for IG professionals looking for helpful, insightful, and educational content.

“Whether you’re a RIM professional looking for creative ways to implement training programs, a governance and compliance manager seeking best practices for creating an internal culture of compliance, or an IT manager researching options for secure IT asset disposition, InfoGoTo is a trusted resource to help you manage your information needs,” the website’s About Us section reads.

The site features five topics: IG, Regulations & Compliance, Privacy & Security, Storage & Destruction, Training & Awareness, and Professional Development. It also has industry-specific content, with stories about the legal, healthcare, and financial services sectors on display.

For the month of May, InfoGoTo will publish content around the following themes: professional development and hiring skills, defensible disposition, IG leadership, and the state of tape. For June, the site will focus on how to create a culture of compliance and the effect of digital transformation on RIM and IG.

Sound like the content is right up your alley? Head on over to the site and check it out. Who knows? It could quickly become your go-to source for all things IG.