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News from the IGI

JASON R. BARON ARGUES IT IS TIME TO ELEVATE IG TO THE C-SUITE

A major barrier to the adoption of effective information governance practices and technologies in the workplace, is the failure to identify a sponsor with sufficient influence and understanding to drive the adoption of IG. In the alphabet soup of titles at the executive level, there are many stakeholders who might have an interest in IG issues, but often there is no one with the responsibility and authority to handle those issues for the organization as a whole. Jason R. Baron (IGI Co-Chair) argues that it is time to elevate responsibility for the job to the C-suite with the creation of a new role of Chief Information Governance Officer in his recent Law Technology News article, “InfoGov Leaders Need More Respect”

Excerpt:

How many organizations are ready to embrace the creation of an independent chief information governance officer as the champion of all things IG?

The top level of all capability maturity models may be in the realm of the aspirational, but it can be an important path forward.

To read the full article, click here.

 

 

JASON R. BARON HONORED FOR OUTSTANDING PUBLIC SERVICE

The IGI is excited to announce that Jason R. Baron (IGI Co-Chair) is being honored for his achievements and contributions in the public service. He is the most recent recipient of the D.C. Chapter of the Federal Bar Association's Justice Tom C. Clark Award for Outstanding Government Lawyer. Baron’s list of achievements is long and includes, most recently, service as the Director of Litigation for the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). To read more about Baron’s tremendous contributions, click here.

Excerpt:

“Jason’s extraordinary record of 33 years of distinguished federal service, including his role in landmark litigation involving White House e-mail, and most recently his leadership in advancing the Obama Administration’s trailblazing initiatives in records and information management, are nothing short of remarkable,” said Bennett B. Borden, a partner in the firm’s Commercial Litigation Section and Co-Chair of the firm’s Information Governance and eDiscovery Group.

Thank you, Jason, for your service and congratulations for an honor well deserved!

 

JASON R. BARON DISCUSSES AUTOMATION OF IG IN RECENT LTN ARTICLE

Can Big Data be tamed? In the face of the explosive growth of the digital universe, the task seems at least daunting if not impossible. Yet, Jason R. Baron (IGI Co-Chair) is optimistic that we can get a handle on our information, and his optimism is born out of forward not just wishful thinking. Baron proposes the use of automated capture and categorization as an effective approach to managing information in his recent Law Technology News article, “Don't Get Discouraged, You Absolutely Can Grasp Information Governance.”

Excerpt:

When evaluating the best way to capture and/or delete information, the one thing that cannot be relied upon is the ultimate user. Legal professionals are notoriously not compliant with any policy or practice that requires more than a single keystroke to implement, whether it is print to paper, or drag and drop.

When considering capture technologies, the ideal situation is an automated system that actually accomplishes the capture without relying on the user to tag or make decisions (except in the initial training of the system).

Similarly, people will provide idiosyncratic and inconsistent approaches to implementing legal holds.

Smart technologies use auto-categorization and other automated ways of classifying information to accomplish both reliable capture and defensible deletion. This should be a fundamental axiom of any information governance program being implemented on a from-this-day- forward basis.

To read the full article, click here.

 

PARTICIPATE IN THE 2014 IGI ANNUAL SURVEY ON INFORMATION GOVERNANCE

Help shape the future of information governance by participating in the Information Governance Initiative’s 2014 Annual Survey.

The IGI is a cross-disciplinary consortium and think tank dedicated to advancing the adoption of information governance practices and technologies. One of our major projects this year is our 2014 IGI Annual Report, which will strive to provide much-needed clarity on IG concepts, definitions, markets, and practices. As part of our research for our report, we are conducting a survey of information governance professionals.

The 2014 IGI Annual Survey should take less than 15 minutes to complete. Please click here to participate.

The IGI appreciates your participation in the 2014 IGI Annual Report. Your participation is essential to our efforts to provide research that will help to advance the adoption of information governance. Thank you.

 

JASON R. BARON AND BARCLAY T. BLAIR TO SPEAK AT WIE SEMINAR ON MAY 15, 2014

Jason R. Baron (IGI Co-Chair) and Barclay T. Blair (IGI Founder & Executive Director) will speak at the upcoming Women in eDiscovery panel, Breaking Down Information Governance: What you really need to know. The event will be held on May 15, 2014 hosted by Baker Hostetler in New York. Judy Selby, founder of the firm’s e-Discovery and Technology Management team and co-chair of its IG team, will lead the discussion. Among the issues the panelists will explore are the meaning of the term, information governance, and the opportunities this emerging field creates. The event is sponsored by IGI Charter Supporter, Nuix.

To learn more about Women in eDiscovery, click here.

 

IGI’S BARCLAY T. BLAIR AND BENNETT B. BORDEN SPEAK AT JOLT SYMPOSIUM

Is having more data always better? Whether you think of managing information from a risk mitigation or business value perspective, the information explosion happening around us demands that we find more effective ways of dealing with our data. Information governance offers the opportunity to gain control over our data and extract value from it. But, to succeed, we need to think differently about information. These and other ideas are explored by Barclay T. Blair (IGI Founder and Executive Director) and Bennett B. Borden (IGI Founder and Chair) during two thought-provoking discussions at the Journal of Law and Technology (JOLT) Symposium, “Information Governance: A Comprehensive Approach to e-Discovery” (February 28, 2014).

In his talk, The State of IG: Who is Doing it, Paying for it, and Recent Trends, Barclay argues that “[w]e need to change the way we think about information,” looking for the patterns that emerge rather than focusing alone on the individual data points or documents, to create meaning. “The value is not in the papyrus; it’s in the pattern. It’s not about the codex; it’s about the corpus,” says Barclay. By looking for patterns in the data, we can extract meaning from data produced incidentally to regular business processes. In this way, IG can act as an “enabler” of new business models. To watch the full talk, click here.

Bennett argues that through the effective use of machine learning and other technologies to review data, the legal community may be able to “sell certainty” to clients about the facts of their case. In his talk, Finding the Signal in the Noise: Information Governance, Analytics, and The Future of Legal Practice, Bennett describes ways in which technology can be used to quickly reconstruct what happened in litigation and other investigations and to even predict future bad acts by searching for patterns linked to such behavior. All of us leave digital tracks which careful investigation can uncover. “In this day and age, we can create certainty, and that is because of the amount of information we have available to us. You simply cannot go throughout your day without leaving a digital trail, even if you wanted to,” say Bennett. To watch the full talk, click here.