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There Has Never Been a Better Time to Get Started with IG

There Has Never Been a Better Time to Get Started with IG

Practical advice from seasoned practitioners

Practical advice from seasoned practitioners

Is your organization just getting started with information governance (IG)? Do you need some guidance getting an effective IG program off the ground?

In the recent article, “Information Governance: Establishing a Program and Executing Initial Projects,” IGI Co-Chair, Jason R. Baron discusses the emerging discipline of IG, makes the case for why IG is needed, and explains how to start an effective IG program at your organization, including: how to identify key stakeholders, build support for IG, and prioritize and execute IG projects. The piece, co-authored with Drinker Biddle associate, Amy Marcos, was the cover article in the October/November 2015 issue of Practical Law: The Journal.

According to the article:

The emerging discipline of information governance (IG) is premised on the idea that both public and private institutions can do a better job of dealing with big data in all of its forms and improve organizational responses to e-discovery, compliance, records management, privacy and security demands. Although there is no universal definition of IG, its major tenets are built on minimizing the risks and maximizing the value associated with data through a coordinated, interdisciplinary approach.

The article cites research from the IGI 2014-2015 Annual Report. Key takeaways from the article, include:

  • A principle-based approach to information governance (IG) can help an organization address data issues as they arise, in a way that benefits the organization and IG stakeholders, and outweighs any costs associated with the initial investment.
  • By understanding the components of a successful IG program, counsel can champion IG strategies that minimize risk and maximize the value of a company’s data.
  • Practicing effective IG means bringing together stakeholders from across your organization to discuss data issues, typically including legal, IT, security, data privacy, compliance, human resources, finance, audit, analytics, and records and information management.
  • A corporate governance framework for IG should include a head executive IG stakeholder or champion and an IG steering committee with specific business unit IG sub-committees.
  • An organization should create IG policies and an IG charter, along with updating their data privacy, email, info security and records retention policies.
  • Cleaning up legacy data and using big data analytics will aid in reducing risk and maximizing the value of your organization’s data.

To read more, download a copy of “Information Governance: Establishing a Program and Executing Initial Projects.”

Want to learn more about getting started with IG? Log in to the IGI Community to access the publications and resources that are available for your use.  Not a member, yet? Join today!

 

Meet Catalyst, the Newest Supporter of the Information Governance Initiative

We are pleased to announce that Catalyst Repository Systems Inc. (Catalyst) is the newest Supporter of the Information Governance Initiative (IGI).

Catalyst designs, hosts and services the world's fastest and most powerful document repositories for large-scale discovery and regulatory compliance. For more than 15 years, corporations and their counsel have relied on Catalyst to help reduce litigation costs and take control of complex legal matters.

“Catalyst is eager to listen and learn from the leaders in the emerging information governance market,” said John Tredennick, CEO. “That’s why we are pleased to support the IGI’s efforts to define the IG space and to bring IG professionals together to advance the state of the art in IG.”

With Catalyst becoming an IGI Supporter, the IGI now has nearly 30 leading IG product and service providers supporting its activities – more than double the number in 2014. This growth and other factor suggest that the predictions contained in our 2014-2015 Annual Report were correct, i.e., that 83% of information governance providers predicted increased revenue in 2015.

 

Learn more about our Supporters.

Contact us about becoming a supporter or other sponsorship opportunities.

 

THE INFORMATION GOVERNANCE INITIATIVE GROWS BY 100% IN 2015

I am proud to announce that we have grown by 100% since our launch just one year ago. We are humbled and honored that so many great organizations have decided to join us in promoting the practice of Information Governance. We all share the conviction that IG is the best chance that organizations have to truly get their information under control and to maximize its value. That’s why we created the Information Governance Initiative – and why we want you to be a part of it.

The IGI launched with a group of Charter Supporters that included Active Navigation, Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP, Equivio, Fontis International, HP Autonomy, Iron Mountain, kCura, Nuix, OpenText, Recall, Recommind, RSD, ViaLumina, Xerox, and ZyLAB. Our Charter Supporters joined us when the IGI was nothing more than an idea and a promise, and we are pleased that each of them (minus one who was acquired by another) will continue to support us in 2015. Later in 2014 we were also joined by Viewpointe LLC.

Today we are honored to announce the new group of innovative companies that have joined the IGI. Joining us today are DTI, Duff & Phelps, EQD, Exterro, Huron Consulting Group, Kroll OnTrack, and Mindseye. We thank them all for their generous support.

Over the past year our dedicated staff has made great progress in furthering our mission. We published our 2014-2015 Annual Report, the first definitive look at the IG concept, market, and discipline. We talked to hundreds of IG practitioners across the globe. We held our very successful IG Boot Camp events. We spoke around the globe. We launched our online community. We broke bread with dozens of senior IG practitioners and heard about their concerns and successes. We built strong partnerships in big data, e-discovery and health information management. We created an incredible advisory board with representatives from the major facts of IG. We weighed in on important legislative developments. We published IG case studies and white papers. We had online hangouts and webinars. It was a busy year.

This year is going to be even busier, with even more of these activities planned. We will hold our first annual Chief Information Governance Officer Summit in Chicago May 20-21. We are holding Boot Camps and executive dinners across the country. We are launching our Task Force program where we will work with IG practitioners to create real, practical IG tools, starting with a model IG steering committee charter. We have other big announcements planned, so stay tuned.

This week will be a busy week for the IGI and our supporters. We are holding a NYC Boot Camp in partnership with Cardozo Law School. We are having our first anniversary cocktail reception. We are delivering a shorter version of our Boot Camp as part of the LTNY program, meeting with our Industry Committee, and speaking several times. We hope to see you there.

Sincerely,
Barclay

 

TAKE A LOOK INSIDE THE 2014 ANNUAL REPORT: THE RACI MATRIX FOR INFORMATION GOVERNANCE

Our next look inside the Information Governance Initiative’s Annual Report 2014 considers what an operational model for information governance (IG) might look like. The full report and related infographics are available for download now at: www.iginitiative.com/community (registration required).

IG is more than a concept or potential market. It is also an operational model for exploiting and controlling information. An effective operational model for IG must provide clarity on who does what and the nature of the relationships among those people involved in IG. As part of our research, we asked IG practitioners to tell us what a RACI matrix for IG might look like at their organizations. A RACI matrix identifies who is Responsible, Accountable (also Approver), Consulted, and Informed as part of a project or initiative. The infographic below illustrates the results of our survey.

IG Graphic_16 v5_L

Operational models, like a RACI matrix, are useful for identifying gaps that can lead to project and program failure. The most common RACI gap that we see is the lack of a person in the Approver role. This is one of the reasons that we are advocating for the creation of the Chief Information Governance Officer, a C-suite-level position in charge of IG.

The above infographic is released under a Creative Commons license that enables you to freely use it as you build support for information governance at your organization. We have also provided a PowerPoint deck including this graphic and speaker notes.

 

TAKE A LOOK INSIDE THE 2014 ANNUAL REPORT: THE IG COMMUNITY PREDICTS GROWTH IN 2015

It is time to take another look inside the IGI’s Annual Report 2014. Today, we examine predictions for the information governance (IG) market in 2015. The full report and related infographics are available for download now at: www.iginitiative.com/community (registration required).

Both practitioners and providers are bullish about next year. According to our research, as illustrated in the infographic below, three quarters of practitioners and 83% of providers expect IG spend and IG revenues, respectively, to grow in 2015. Over one quarter of practitioners and 42% of providers expect a growth rate of 30% or more.

IG Graphic_9_v4_L

The above infographic is released under a Creative Commons license that enables you to freely use it as you build support for information governance at your organization. We have also provided a PowerPoint deck including this graphic and speaker notes.

 
IGI Bust Stop

TAKE A LOOK INSIDE THE 2014 ANNUAL REPORT: QUANTIFYING THE FINANCIAL BENEFITS OF IG

Our next look inside the Information Governance Initiative’s Annual Report 2014 examines what the information governance (IG) market is doing in terms of quantifying the benefits of IG. The full report and related infographics are available for download now at: www.iginitiative.com/community (registration required).

According to our research, over two-thirds (68%) of practitioners and 91% of providers believe that quantifying the financial benefits of IG is important to their organizations or clients and prospects, respectively. See the infographic below.

Total cost of ownership (TCO) and return on investment (ROI) are the key financial models being used. The vast majority of practitioners and providers report that their models were developed internally. Further, most included “soft” costs in their models.

IG Graphic_8 v3_L

The above infographic is released under a Creative Commons license that enables you to freely use it as you build support for information governance at your organization. We have also provided a PowerPoint deck including this graphic and speaker notes.