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IG Stories: Unifying IG at a Large, Slow-Moving Company

IG Stories: Unifying IG at a Large, Slow-Moving Company

Throughout our conversations with people in the IG community, we have been told repeatedly that hearing what other practitioners are doing is especially valuable to advancing the discipline of IG. The community is eager to learn from fellow practitioners’ answers to questions like: How did you get started with IG? How did you “sell” the program internally? What obstacles did you encounter and how did you overcome them? What are you working on, now—specifically, how are you achieving successful IG? In Stories in Information Governance: The IGI 2015 Benchmarking Report, we look at how some practitioners have answered these (and other) important questions, and we provide useful “tips” to practitioners based on those responses. In our blog series, IG Stories, we explore excerpts from the Benchmarking Report.

 

In our last look inside the Benchmarking Report, we saw how one organization was breaking down silos to achieve IG success. Today, we learn how bringing in a consultant might help get your IG program started and how a lack of high-level support for IG can sometimes be a serious barrier.

 

Benchmark Snapshot

Vertical: Insurance
Size: Over 10,000 employees
Program Maturity Rating: 2 – Repeatable (Self Ranking) / 3 – Defined (Our Ranking)
2014 IG Budget: Unreported
2015 IG Budget: Unreported

Benchmark Overview

Evan is a records manager at a Fortune 50 insurance company. His position falls within the legal group, and he handles records management for in-house counsel and compliance, a group of several hundred people.

Evan’s responsibilities have grown over the years from shipping records offsite to now managing the totality of information that moves through his group. He is currently involved in a large information management project aimed at pulling together the different pieces of how information is being handled so that they can be uniformly managed.

Right now, he reports, it is difficult to have a clear view into other parts of the company, and he considers it a bit like “herding cats.” The goal is to bring all of this under control within a reasonable amount of time and money.

Using a Consultant to Get IG Started

Bringing in a consultant is sometimes an effective way to get an IG program or specific project moving. Consultants bring an outside perspective and can sometimes provide a clearer view of the problem (and hence the solution).

Evan is using this approach. The general counsel wanted to do better at IG and wanted to make sure that the company was not unnecessarily keeping outdated and useless information. To achieve their goals, they hired a consultant to help build consensus and to pull things together.

Taking the consultant’s advice, they are now working on a large project that includes a defensible disposition analysis and the development of an overall strategic plan on how IG should be organized and led. They started in legal but are now looping in other departments. There are initiatives underway in various parts of the company, and they are trying to pull these together with a consultant under one effort. The chief of staff to the general counsel is leading the charge.

IG Stories: Unifying IG at a Large, Slow-Moving Company

The Need for C-Suite Support

Evan identifies the absence of a “CIO-type” leader as the single biggest barrier he faces. The responsibilities of a senior IG leader are now spread out across the company. He needs someone at a higher level with sufficient authority and budget to get the work done.

Many practitioners point to the lack of executive sponsorship as a barrier to achieving their IG goals. Some, like Evan, are beginning to see the importance of elevating the role to the C-suite. Many IG programs suffer from the absence of a single person with the authority and breadth of organizational knowledge to join all of the parts of IG at a company into an operational whole.

At the IGI, we support the creation of an IG-specific position, the Chief IG Officer (CIGO). The CIO could serve this function, perhaps, but at many organizations, they are only responsible for technology infrastructure and not the information itself.

Practitioner Tips:

Use Outside IG Expertise

Using a consultant can help bring new perspectives on old problems and can jump start an IG project or program. If your IG efforts are stuck, consider bringing in outside help to get you started. Consultants are sometimes a way to effectively supplement your internal knowledge base.

Create a Senior IG Role

The lack of a person with the knowledge and authority to tie an organization’s IG program into an operational whole can lead to its failure. Elevate IG authority to the C-suite with the creation of an IG-specific role, like the CIGO.

 

To learn more, download your free copy of Stories in Information Governance: The IGI 2015 Benchmarking Report at our online community. Not a member yet? Join today.

 
Facets of Information Governance

Spinning the IG Wheel: An IGI Annual Report Deep Dive

Last month, the IGI published its Annual Report 2015-2016, the industry’s most comprehensive research on information governance (IG) as a concept, profession, and market. The report is based on extensive surveying of IG practitioners and providers. If you haven’t downloaded your copy of the IGI Annual Report 2015-2016, take a look inside with us to see what you could learn.

horizontal break

The wheel is back!

Our most widely adopted infographic from last year’s Report was the one representing the activities the IG community includes within the concept of IG. Sometimes called “the pinwheel” and “the flower” by our community, this infographic has found its way into myriad presentations and publications and has sparked many fruitful discussions about IG.

Because the IG community found this so useful, we revisited the topic this year. We offered a list of twenty-two activities that might be considered to fall under the rubric of IG and asked which ones respondents included within the concept. Our list of activities or “facets” of IG, as we like to call them, included both risk- and value-focused activities. It included activities out of which IG first developed as a discipline and some emerging activities that are important components of our information activities.

The infographic ranks these by the percentage of respondents who said the facet is included in IG. Most agreed that nineteen of the twenty-two facets were a part of their concept of IG. Further, a strong majority of respondents (83%) agreed that this list was complete. The number of respondents selecting “all of the above” for all twenty-two facets was 23% lower than last year. We think this means that the concept of IG is coming into greater focus.

This is a foundational infographic for our community because it so clearly shows the coordinating function that IG must play within our organizations. Most organizations fail to coordinate groups of people fundamentally trying to solve the same problems, but as anyone who has tried to take on a complex, multi-departmental information project at a large organization knows, operation of these facets of IG in isolation of each other often impedes progress. No doubt, a reason why this infographic has resonated with so many is that the coordinating function of IG promises to put an end to the disconnected approach to information that is a common barrier to successful IG, a concept we explore in detail throughout the Annual Report.

Certain facets garnered more support for inclusion in the concept. The disciplines that have formed the core of IG from the beginning led the way. RIM had over 94% support for inclusion, with information security and protection, compliance, and e-discovery having more than 80% support. The current risk focus of IG, a recurrent theme throughout the Annual Report, likely reflects the immaturity of IG as a discipline that emerged predominately from risk-focused activities. That said, organizations are taking on value-side information activities. As the discipline of IG matures, we expect more organizations to execute projects focused on adding business value.

To learn more, download your free copy of the IGI Annual Report 2015-2016 at our online community. Not a member yet? Join today.

 
IG Stories: Breaking Down Silos

IG Stories: Breaking Down Silos

Throughout our conversations with people in the IG community, we have been told repeatedly that hearing what other practitioners are doing is especially valuable to advancing the discipline of IG. The community is eager to learn from fellow practitioners’ answers to questions like: How did you get started with IG? How did you “sell” the program internally? What obstacles did you encounter and how did you overcome them? What are you working on, now—specifically, how are you achieving successful IG? In Stories in Information Governance: The IGI 2015 Benchmarking Report, we look at how some practitioners have answered these (and other) important questions, and we provide useful “tips” to practitioners based on those responses. In our blog series, IG Stories, we explore excerpts from the Benchmarking Report.

Today, we learn how one organization is breaking down silos to achieve IG success.

 

Benchmark Snapshot

Vertical: Government
Size: Unreported
Program Maturity Rating: 1 – Initial (Self Ranking) / 1 – Initial (Our Ranking)
2014 IG Budget: Unreported
2015 IG Budget: Unreported

Benchmark Overview

Andrew is a records management leader at a state department of health. When enterprise content management (ECM) was assigned to his group, they made it clear that in order to do things properly, a commitment to IG was necessary. Currently, Andrew’s department is working on setting up SharePoint®, including drafting IG policies and procedures. They are also raising awareness of IG and its value whenever they can.

2015 Benchmarking Report Blog No 1 Graphic

Planting the IG Seed

Consultants can help get IG started at your organization or help to implement a specific project. Andrew’s boss is a supporter of IG; he brought in a consultant who did “a mile wide, inch-deep” analysis of their situation. The consultant then gave a presentation outlining a road map indicating how the health department might implement an IG program. Though IG lost momentum for a period of time due to a shutdown, that event sufficiently planted the seed, convincing the organization IG was important enough to move forward.

Ending Silos and One-Offs

Various functional areas charged with handling information or facets of IG can become isolated or “siloed.” This can lead to one-off projects that fail to consider the bigger picture of the role information plays inside an organization. IG promises to end this disconnected approach, consolidating the management and control of information.

When Andrew’s team was building support for their IG efforts, they shared their plans with IT first. Their presentation explained that information was not just IT’s problem and that a coordinated approach to IG was better. IT really appreciated that perspective instead of being the ones solely responsibleIGI Practitioner Tips Consider an Outside Expert for finding solutions. This more integrated approach helps ensure that all stakeholder interests are taken into account and the job is done right.

Practitioner Tips:

Shatter Silos

In the world of IG, silos and one-off projects simply will not work. Break down the walls between various departments that handle information. Demonstrate how a more coordinated effort to handle information adds value.

To learn more, download your free copy of Stories in Information Governance: The IGI 2015 Benchmarking Report at our online community. Not a member yet? Join today.

 

IGI RELEASES NEW REPORT: INFORMATION GOVERNANCE IN 2020: 2020 VISION ON INFORMATION GOVERNANCE

As part of our research, we developed a “tension pair,” a set of statements reflecting opposing views, about the future of information governance (IG). One half of the tension pair presented an optimistic view of the state of IG by 2020; the other, a pessimistic one. We asked IG subject matter experts (SMEs) and pundits to take our survey and gave them an opportunity to provide additional insights. We published the results of the research this month in our report, Information Governance in 2020: 2020 Vision on Information Governance. Log in through our community site to download your copy.

As the infographic below shows, IG SMEs and pundits are fairly optimistic about the future of IG in 2020. Of the 28 respondents, 19 (68%) selected the more optimistic choice.

Industry Experts Optimistic about Future of IG

It is important to note, however, that the tension pair structure of the question forces a choice between two options. The selection of comments presented in the report shows that respondents’ thinking on the subject is much more nuanced, with some falling somewhere in between the two options. The results are also generally in alignment with a similar question posed to the IG community as part of our 2014 Annual Report. While both the results of the tension pair and the survey question from the report are generally optimistic, they do not paint a picture of IG perfection by 2020. 2020 is not far away and much work remains to be done to reach the more optimistic predictions.

The above infographic is released under a Creative Commons license that enables you to freely use it as you build support for information governance at your organization. Log in through our community site to download your copy.

 

TAKE A LOOK INSIDE THE 2014 ANNUAL REPORT: THE IG COMMUNITY PREDICTS GROWTH IN 2015

It is time to take another look inside the IGI’s Annual Report 2014. Today, we examine predictions for the information governance (IG) market in 2015. The full report and related infographics are available for download now at: www.iginitiative.com/community (registration required).

Both practitioners and providers are bullish about next year. According to our research, as illustrated in the infographic below, three quarters of practitioners and 83% of providers expect IG spend and IG revenues, respectively, to grow in 2015. Over one quarter of practitioners and 42% of providers expect a growth rate of 30% or more.

IG Graphic_9_v4_L

The above infographic is released under a Creative Commons license that enables you to freely use it as you build support for information governance at your organization. We have also provided a PowerPoint deck including this graphic and speaker notes.

 
IGI Bust Stop

TAKE A LOOK INSIDE THE 2014 ANNUAL REPORT: QUANTIFYING THE FINANCIAL BENEFITS OF IG

Our next look inside the Information Governance Initiative’s Annual Report 2014 examines what the information governance (IG) market is doing in terms of quantifying the benefits of IG. The full report and related infographics are available for download now at: www.iginitiative.com/community (registration required).

According to our research, over two-thirds (68%) of practitioners and 91% of providers believe that quantifying the financial benefits of IG is important to their organizations or clients and prospects, respectively. See the infographic below.

Total cost of ownership (TCO) and return on investment (ROI) are the key financial models being used. The vast majority of practitioners and providers report that their models were developed internally. Further, most included “soft” costs in their models.

IG Graphic_8 v3_L

The above infographic is released under a Creative Commons license that enables you to freely use it as you build support for information governance at your organization. We have also provided a PowerPoint deck including this graphic and speaker notes.