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E-Discovery and IG in 2017 and Beyond: The Recording of Our Online Discussion Now Available

We had a great online discussion this week with IGI Charter Supporter OpenText about trends in e-discovery and IG for 2017 and beyond. We also talked about the significance of their recent acquisition of Recommind and what it says about OpenText's product strategy and the market in general.

The video will be available here on our public site for a week, at which point it will move to the Resources section of our growing online community, where you can create a profile and interact with your IG peers. The slides from this online event will also be available there shortly.

 
Resilient leaders

What Do Resilient Information Leaders Do Differently? Learn Nine Habits that Lead to Success!

Join our webinar, 9 Habits of Resilient Information Leaders, on Thursday, August 25, 2016 from 1:00-2:00 PM CDT (2:00-3:00 EST). In the midst of high-stakes litigation the ediscovery battle can become heated, stressful, and demanding. Join our webinar to find out what sets resilient information leaders apart from the rest and how that leads to success, even when the going gets tough. Register, today!

The panel includes:

  • Barclay T. Blair, Co-Founder and Executive Director of the Information Governance Initiative (IGI) and originator of the concept and framework for the resilient information leader.
  • Dean Gonsowksi, VP of business development at kCura.
  • George Socha, co-founder of EDRM and managing director for thought at BDO.
  • Brian Stempel, director of litigation technology at Kirkland & Ellis LLP.

The panel will share their thoughts and insights gained from years of working with legal teams, technologists, and other IG professional

Topic the panel will discuss:

  • The nine habits of resilient leaders that set them apart from the rest.
  • Actual examples of this habits in action and sometimes not
  • Practical steps for how you can apply what you’ve learned in your own work

Register, today, to save yourself a seat. Unable to attend? Register to receive access to a recording of the webinar after the event.

 

Is Your Strategy (or Lack Thereof) For Long-Term Digital Information Putting Your Organization at Risk?

In our previous look inside The Governance of Long-Term Digital Information: An IGI 2016 Benchmark, we saw that many of the options organizations are using to store long-term digital records and information are inadequate to ensure preservation and accessibility long into the future. Today, we explore the gap between practitioners’ awareness of the threat and steps their organizations are taking to protect digital information. The data reported here are from quantitative, survey-based research conducted by the IGI in Spring 2016.

Why aren’t organizations doing more to protect their digital information assets? Awareness of the problem is very high—97 percent. Yet, many are failing to take definitive action to ensure that their critical information assets are protected and accessible over the long term.

We asked practitioners what their organizations were doing to address the unique challenge of safeguarding their long-term digital records and information and to select all that applied. While it is good news to see that 44 percent are currently considering what to do (as the infographic shows), only 16 percent report that they are transferring data to a standards-based digital preservation system. Further, nearly a third of our respondents (31 percent), report that their organizations do not have a comprehensive approach.

Sixteen percent report postponing action until it is required—a risky strategy. As discussed previously, if you delay the steps necessary to safeguard your information from the start, degradation, corruption, and obsolescence can happen in the meantime. You may find when you need digital records and information they are not fully intact or that the costs (time, money, and technical resources) nGovernance of Long-Term DIgital Information: An IGI 2016 Benchmarkecessary to access and read them are prohibitively high.

Finally, a third of respondents report that they are converting official records to a common file type (e.g. PDF, TXT, or CSV). While this approach might seem to work, for now, for certain types of documents, there is also the risk that the chosen file format itself might become obsolete. If you adopt a strategy of converting once (especially if you do not also retain the original format), yo
u also risk losing your vital information should such obsolescence occur. To be effective, digital preservation needs to be an active process. In addition, these simplified formats do not really work for certain content. You can’t preserve multimedia files (images, video, and audio, for example) this way. Further, other content, like websites, emails, spreadsheets, slide presentations, and maps, for example, lose their interactivity, context, and inherent value when saved this way.

Get your copy of The Governance of Long-Term Digital Information: An IGI 2016 Benchmark.

IGI Supporter, Preservica, has enabled us to make the full Benchmark available for immediate download at no cost.

There are two ways to get the Benchmark:

  1. Download from Preservica.
  2. Existing IGI Community Members can find it in the Community here. Not a member, yet? Join today.

Join us for an online event with Preservica to discuss the key findings of the Benchmark on June 8th, 2016 at 11:00 AM EST, 4:00 PM UK. Register today.

 
Goverance of Long-Term Digital Information

Is Your Archiving Strategy Broken? Our New Benchmark Shows that Most Organizations are Making Poor Choices for Protecting Long-Term Digital Information

Governance of Long-Term DIgital Information: An IGI 2016 BenchmarkIn our previous look inside The Governance of Long-Term Digital Information: An IGI 2016 Benchmark, we saw that most practitioners (98 percent) reported that their organizations keep or need to keep digital information long term (more than 10 years). Today, we explore where organizations are keeping that information. What we find is that often the options they choose put their information at risk of not being accessible in the future. The data reported here are from quantitative, survey-based research conducted by the IGI in Spring 2016.

According to our research, most organizations are not storing their long-term digital assets in a manner sufficient to ensure their long-term protection and accessibility. In fact, the top method is shared network drives. This option, like a number of the others listed (including ECM and EDRMS), even with additional backup or archiving, provides no inherent capability to address the unique requirements of this class of information. This exposes the organization to the risk of not being able to read and use these digital information assets in the future, for example, if your organization no longer supports or licenses a particular application or the file format becomes obsolete. In addition, shared network drives are notoriously insecure and nearly impossible to govern well, further exposing these assets to accidental or malicious tampering and deletion.

Organizations should seek out technological solutions that are purpose-built for the unique requirements of long-term protection and access. Unfortunately today, only a small percentage of organizations (11 percent) are employing these systems, putting vast swaths of critical information across the globe at risk.

Get your copy of The Governance of Long-Term Digital Information: An IGI 2016 Benchmark.

IGI Supporter, Preservica, has enabled us to make the full Benchmark available for immediate download at no cost. There are two ways to get the Benchmark:

  1. Download from Preservica.
  2.  Existing IGI Community Members can find it in the Community here. Not a member, yet? Join today.

Join us for an online event with Preservica to discuss the key findings of the Benchmark on June 8th, 2016 at 11:00 AM EST, 4:00 PM UK. Register today.

 
Digital Preservation Benchmark

IGI’s New Industry Benchmark Exposes the Grave Threat to Information Over the Long Term

Our new Benchmark reveals that most organizations cannot ensure protection and access for critical long-term digital information despite accelerating legal and business requirements. It also calls for immediate action and provides insight and guidance to help organizations achieve compliance.

Our research reveals that the majority of organizations do not have a coherent long-term strategy for their vital digital information even though virtually all of them (98%) are required to keep information for ten years or longer. Further, while 97% of information professionals understand the need for a specialized approach to these assets, only 11% are storing them in systems specifically designed to ensure long-term protection and access. This gap has societal, economic, and legal implications.

Our research, supported by Preservica, provides a new benchmark for organizations to evaluate their capability and outlines tactics for closing this critical gap. It also reports on how leading organizations like Associated Press, HSBC, and the State of Texas have addressed this challenge.

The Governance of Long-Term Digital Information: IGI 2016 Benchmark also reveals that IG professionals charged with addressing this problem are highly aware (97%) of the unique challenge of opening, using, and relying upon digital files over the long-term. Namely, that accelerating innovation and technology refresh rates mean that software and hardware can be obsolete, making the information unusable, long before an organization’s legal need or business requirement to keep and use that information expires.

However, most organizations appear to lack a coherent strategy to solve this problem. An alarming majority of organizations (68%), for example, rely on shared network drives to store these assets, a technology that offers no inherent capabilities to protect or ensure access over the long-term.

“Every day it becomes easier and cheaper to store digital information,” said Barclay T. Blair, executive director and founder of IGI. “But every day we also see an intensification of global legal and business obligations to protect and provide long-term access to these critical assets. Our Benchmark shows that virtually every organization large and small across industry verticals faces this problem, but awareness of how to solve it is low. This concerns us.”

Preservica’s support has enabled the IGI to make the full Benchmark available for immediate download at no cost.

There are two ways to get the Benchmark:

1.       Download from Preservica.

2.       Existing IGI Community Members can find it in the Community here.

Also, we are holding an online event with Preservica to discuss the key findings of the Benchmark on June 8th at 11am EST, 4pm UK. Register today.

 
Privacy Shield Drinker Biddle Webinar

Attend March 9th Webinar on the EU-US Privacy Shield Framework

How will the new EU-US Privacy Shield Framework affect the flow of personal data across the Atlantic? Join us for a webinar hosted by IGI founding supporter, Drinker, Biddle, and Reath on the Privacy Shield to find out more.

When: March 9, 2016 from 11:45 AM to 1:00 PM (ET)
Registration: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7245955722860604674

In October of 2015, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) invalidated the Safe Harbor framework for transatlantic data transfer because it was found to provide inadequate (less than EU standards) protection for the data of EU citizens. The adequacy of the framework was attacked, in part, because it did not apply to certain US government authorities which could override such “safe harbor” provisions and access or use data in ways violating EU privacy protections. Among other objections, the CJEU raised the lack of adequate legal remedies for individuals seeking access, correction, or deletion of data.

The invalidation of the Safe Harbor framework created a state of disruption for companies who relied predominately on the framework to address transatlantic data transfers—though others using date transfer options outside of Safe Harbor were less scathed.
After two years of discussion, on February 29, 2016, the EU-US Privacy Shield Framework was released. A joint effort of the European Commission and the US Department of Commerce, it is intended to address the concerns raised by the CJEU and provide more stringent privacy protections.

Included in the new framework are: several avenues through which individuals may file complaints and seek timely redress of grievances; tougher compliance obligations for companies; increased monitoring and enforcement by US government agencies; limitations including transparency and oversight of government access of data; and joint review of the framework by the US and the EU.

The webinar will address the new obligations companies will face, including:

  • Self-certification
  • Revision to privacy policies
  • US enforcement mechanisms
  • EU monitoring